PadiglioneItalia 2015

#49 A new location, new designers and consistent design in a limited collection are the distinguishing features of the third PadiglioneItalia, curated by Claudia Pignatale. #salone2015

Gio Tirotto, Coexist, Sky. Photo Serena Eller
Now in its third year, with a new location (moved from Ventura to Residenze Litta in Corso Magenta) and different designers (at least in part, there are several newcomers), Padiglioneitalia proves more consistent and convincing than ever.
“What Secondome and Padiglioneitalia have in common are experimentation, their distance from everyday industrialisation, research and craft production”, explains the curator Claudia Pignatale, owner of the Secondome gallery in Rome. All this forms the basis for a collection of pieces in a limited and numbered edition exploring the potential of combining such radically different materials as glass and metal.
 Padiglioneitalia, Secondome, vista dell'allestimento alle Residenze Litta. Photo Jacopo Valentini
Top : Gio Tirotto, Coexist, Sky. Photo Serena Eller. Above : Padiglioneitalia, Secondome, view of the exhibition at Residenze Litta. Photo Jacopo Valentini
This approach appears in the designs of the four Padiglione founders: from Gio Tirotto’s transparent globes – two glass balls, one for the sky and one for the earth, that show what is on the other side – to Alhambretto’s vase, a glass ball resting without being perforated on a twisted nail cast in bronze and then gilded; from CTRLZAK’s “magnetic” hourglass, through which iron filings pass to form a sculpture that seems to halt time, to Alessandro Zambelli’s sculpture keeping a candle flame at the same height as the wax melts.
Padiglioneitalia, Secondome, vista dell'allestimento alle Residenze Litta. Photo Jacopo Valentini
Padiglioneitalia, Secondome, view of the exhibition at Residenze Litta. Photo Jacopo Valentini

It also applies to works by the “newcomers”, five designers invited by the gallery owner. Giorgia Zanellato has designed a series of vases in three different galvanic metal finishes whereas Matteo Cibic has created a transgenic-inspired lamp with a filament, in glass and with a gilded brass base. 

Simone Fanciullacci and Antonio de Marco of design studio 4P1B propose two machines that complicate simple actions – and really need never have been designed – such as pouring water from a pitcher or extinguishing a candle flame.

Completing the collection are Zaven’s Olimpia lamp, midway between the architectural sculpture and the design object, and the work of artist Marco Raparelli, who has created an installation in which his designs take shape on an iron table made by artist and blacksmith Giovanni Casellato.

Raparelli+Casellato, A story that doesn't get told. Photo Serena Eller
Raparelli+Casellato, A story that doesn't get told. Photo Serena Eller

April 14–19, 2015
Padiglioneitalia
Secondome

curated by Claudia Pignatal
Residenze Litta
corso Magenta 24, Milano

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