Glitches in Alltagsobjekte

Born from Vincent Brinkmann and Jan Sengstake’s workshop at the University of Arts Bremen, this project seeing glitches as an influence from the digital to the physical.

Vincent Brinkmann and Jan Sengstake, Glitches in Alltagsobjekte
As almost all objects have their origin in the digital world in the conceptional phase, constructing process and media representation, in their workshop at the University of Arts Bremen Vincent Brinkmann and Jan Sengstake wanted to focus on artefacts and errors in this process.
They set up a workshop dealing with glitches made by modelling and scanning software, not ignoring or repair them but seeing glitches as an influence from the digital to the physical.

Objects made with a 3D-printer are ideal to use as a model for the casting process. The 3D-prints can fairly contemplate the lost-wax-casting method. The designers mainly used the common printer material ABS (Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) as it’s made out of crude oil. ABS easily burns out without remnants when preparing the molds for casting in the oven. Objects made out of PLA (Polylactic acid) are also suitable but have a weaker performance with thinner models.

A very interesting notice is that the structure of the 3D-print is transferred to the casting. You can still see the isolines and the layered structure of the 3D-printed objects. Is this the beginning of a new design aesthetic?


Glitches in Alltagsobjekte
A workshop by Vincent Brinkmann and Jan Sengstake

Workshop “3D-print and casting”
University of Arts Bremen (HFK Bremen)
Participants: Christine Brovkina, Dustin Sherman, Eran Amir, Felix Fisgus, Joris Holte, Jonas Holst, Lennard Ulrich, Marcel Vesga, Sven Rose, Thomas Hoheisel


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