Harmonious Diversity

Japan’s Pavilion for Expo 2015, designed by Atsushi Kitagawara like one of the traditional houses of Kyoto, symbolizes the wealth and the multiplicity of Japan’s culture.

Atsushi Kitagawara, Padiglione Giapponese, Diversità armoniosa, Expo Milano 2015
Japan’s Pavilion, designed by Japan’s architects, Atsushi Kitagawara, will interpret the theme of the Universal Exposition in Milan “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life,” representing all its knowledge, experience and techniques, within the production and culture of food.
Utsuwa is the term used to describe the traditional Japanese ceramics that are characterized by many different styles, and likewise, its pavilion symbolizes the wealth and the multiplicity of Japan’s culture. Representing the fusion between tradition and modernity, environmental and aesthetic perfection, Japan proposes a pavilion that spreads over an exhibition area of ​​4,170 square meters, with a wide entrance and lengthwise orientation, like one of the traditional houses of Kyoto. In addition to the use of natural materials such as bamboo and wood, it makes use of technologies and systems for energy conservation. Furthermore, a range of events and installations stimulate the five senses, allowing visitors to fully experience Japan’s food culture.
Atsushi Kitagawara, Padiglione Giapponese, Diversità armoniosa, Expo Milano 2015
Atsushi Kitagawara, Japanese pavilion, Harmonious Diversity, Expo Milano 2015

The use of the renewable resource of wood for the pavilion connects it to issues of forest maintenance and protection. Forests promote the creation of water rich in nutrients, which is then returned to the land and the seas, stimulating the creation of the diverse food that people eat.

The use of trees and lifestyles of people have been closely connected within satoyama (natural woodlands that coexist with a nearby populated area) in Japan since ancient times. Within these communities, Japan has fostered ideal recycling-oriented societies. The Japan Pavilion will adopt a three-dimensional wooden grid as construction materials that embody sustainability, one of the keywords of Expo 2015 Milano.

The three-dimensional wooden grid will symbolize the origin of Japan’s diversity – the four seasons, nature, ecosystem and food. The Pavilion will take the shape of a “bowl of diversity”.

Atsushi Kitagawara, Padiglione Giapponese, Diversità armoniosa, Expo Milano 2015
Atsushi Kitagawara, Japanese pavilion, Harmonious Diversity, Expo Milano 2015

The traditional wooden construction techniques of Japan – epitomized in Horyuji Temple – use a compressive strain method in which joints consists only of carved wood, without metal couplers, for support. This results in constructions that are extremely resistant to earthquakes; a kind of building that has sometimes been called “living construction (or life theory construction).”

The pavilion, created from a three-dimensional wooden grid, will be the first ever to use both traditional construction knowledge about wooden frameworks and modern analysis and application of compressive strain. This will result in truly innovative construction that fuses Japan’s traditional culture and advanced technology.

Atsushi Kitagawara, Padiglione Giapponese, Diversità armoniosa, Expo Milano 2015
Atsushi Kitagawara, Japanese pavilion, Harmonious Diversity, Expo Milano 2015

Japanese pavilion, Harmonious Diversity, Expo Milano 2015
Architect : Atsushi Kitagawara
Organizer : Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry
CO-organizer : Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism
Participant : Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO)
Area : 4,170 sqm

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